Coming of Age Ceremonies

ComingOfAgeSHOULD THEY BE ALL ABOUT THE CHILD OR MORE ABOUT ASSUMING AN ADULT ROLE IN SOCIETY?

There are many transitions in the long journey from infancy to adulthood but let’s focus is on the passages from childhood to adolescence and from adolescence into adulthood. Many people arrive at both these crossroads without much of a clue as to what comes next (is it going to be traumatic?) or how to deal with it (is it going to be difficult?). if you are interested in the true fundamentals of Coming of Age, I can help you create a ceremony that addresses:

  • Your child’s place in the community
  • Your child’s responsibilities to family and the community
  • Your child’s contributions to family and the community
  • The community and your families’ responsibility to your child

According to Christina Goff, modern Coming Of Age ceremonies don’t always meet the child’s deeper need to learn how to fit into the larger community, develop strategies for dealing with challenges, and become individuals who can take care of themselves as well as others. Of course, no ritual as a stand-alone event can accomplish all that but, in some cases, the Coming Of Age ceremony is the only acknowledgement of passage a child receives. If the event is primarily a party, guests are given a welcome opportunity learn what parents and close family members already know about the child – her/his interests, abilities and general demeanor – but the child gets no deep sense of transition into adulthood because the ceremony alone doesn’t change:

  • Her personal activities and responsibilities
  • His role in the community
  • The way she is viewed and treated by the community

The morning after the ceremony, in both the child’s mind and in the parents’, the child is still a child, the only difference is that now he/she has a lot of thank you notes to write.

I can create a ceremony for your childe that includes current trends but still provides elements that deal with the fundamental truth that Coming Of Age celebrations were originally formulated to address: recognition of the child’s transition into adulthood.